THE INSENSITIVE INDIAN (LET’S STOP PRETENDING THERE’S NO RACISM IN INDIA)

This is a two-article series from the Hindu

“MOST INDIANS THINK RACISM EXISTS ONLY IN THE WEST AND SEE THEMSELVES AS VICTIMS. IT’S TIME THEY EXAMINED THEIR OWN ATTITUDES TOWARDS PEOPLE FROM THE COUNTRY'S NORTH-EAST”


THE INSENSITIVE INDIAN


This editorial was originally published by the Hindu at http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/editorial/article3391080.ece on 7 May 2012  

Two students from the North-East have died unnatural deaths in the last few days. Dana Sangma, a student from Meghalaya studying for an MBA at an institute in Gurgaon, committed suicide after she was accused by her college of cheating; Richard Loitam, a student of architecture from Manipur, was found dead in his hostel room in Bangalore from head injuries. In both cases, there have been allegations of callousness by the college authorities and by the police in investigating the deaths, and in Sangma's case, of driving her to taking her own life by discriminating against her. It took protests by the community of North-East students and others in these two cities and interventions in Parliament for the police to register a case under the Scheduled Caste/Scheduled Tribe Act in her case, and to start murder investigations into Loitam's death. While it is for the police to establish if college officials abetted Sangma's suicide, and to trace the culprits responsible for the other student's death, it is hard to disagree with the impression that has gained ground in the North-East after these two incidents that the institutional response might have been swifter had the students been from “mainland India”. Despite the increasing presence of people from the seven North-Eastern States — students as well as economic migrants — in all the major cities of India, there is a collective prejudice against them that is undeniable.

The prejudice is driven by racism, no less, and there is no point mincing words or being coy about this. This racism manifests itself on the Indian street in rude comments, stares, and facile judgments about the lifestyle and morals of people from the North-East. Such attitudes put women from the region at particular risk of sexual harassment and worse, as several incidents over the past few years have sadly demonstrated. People from the ‘seven sisters' — and especially from Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram and Nagaland — also face difficulties finding accommodation in many cities outside the region. The same is true of Kashmiri students and migrants, who often have to deal with the added burden of being harassed by local law enforcement. Last year, the Union Home Ministry issued an advisory to all States asking that Kashmiris not be singled out unnecessarily for police reporting merely because of their origin. Now the MHA has promised there will be “zero tolerance” for crimes against people from the North-East. India has spent an enormous amount of blood and treasure safeguarding its physical territory from militant groups, secessionists and foreign powers. It is time we stopped being insensitive towards the people who venture inland from those boundaries to seek a better life.


LET’S STOP PRETENDING THERE’S NO RACISM IN INDIA



by Yengkhom Jilangamba (A Visiting Associate Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi.)
This article was originally published by the Hindu at http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/article3466554.ece on 29 March 2012 

Most Indians think racism exists only in the West and see themselves as victims. It's time they examined their own attitudes towards people from the country's North-East

The mysterious death of Loitam Richard in Bangalore, the murder of Ramchanphy Hongray in New Delhi, the suicide by Dana Sangma and other such incidents serve as reminders of the insecure conditions under which people, particularly the young, from the north-east of India have to live with in the metros of this country. What these deaths have in common is that the three individuals were all from a certain part of the country, had a “particular” physical appearance, and were seen as outsiders in the places they died. These incidents have been read as a symptom of the pervasive racial discrimination that people from the region face in metropolitan India.

An institutionalised form


Quite expectedly, such an assertion about the existence of racism in India will not be taken seriously; the response will be to either remain silent and refuse to acknowledge this form of racism or, fiercely, to reject it. Ironically, most Indians see racism as a phenomenon that exists in other countries, particularly in the West, and without fail, see themselves as victims. They do not see themselves harbouring (potentially) racist attitudes and behaviour towards others whom they see as inferior.

But time and again, various groups of people, particularly from the north-east have experienced forms of racial discrimination and highlighted the practice of racism in India. In fact, institutionalised racism has been as much on the rise as cases of everyday racism in society.

In a case of racial profiling, the University of Hyderabad chose to launch its 2011 “initiative” to curb drinking and drug use on campus by working with students from the north-east. In 2007, the Delhi Police decided to solve the problems of security faced by the north-easterners in Delhi, particularly women, by coming up with a booklet entitled Security Tips for North East Students asking north-eastern women not to wear “revealing dresses” and gave kitchen tips on preparing bamboo shoot, akhuni, and “other smelly dishes” without “creating ruckus in neighbourhood.”

BRICS summit


Very recently, in the run-up to the BRICS summit in New Delhi, the Delhi Police's motto of “citizens first” was on full display, when they arrested or put under preventive detention the non-citizens — the Tibetan refugees. But the real problem for the security personnel cropped up when they had to identity Tibetans on the streets of Delhi. This problem for the state forces was compounded by the fact that Delhi now has a substantial migrant population from the north-east whose physical features could be quite similar to those of Tibetans. So, the forces went about raiding random places in Delhi, questioning and detaining people from the region. North-eastern individuals travelling in vehicles, public transport, others at their workplaces, and so on all became suspects.

Many were asked to produce their passports or other documents to prove that, indeed, they were Indian citizens and not refugee Tibetans. In some cases, “authentic” Indians had to intervene in order to endorse and become guarantors of the authenticity of the nationality of these north-easterners. The situation became farcical and caught the attention of the judiciary reportedly after two lawyers from the region were interrogated and harassed. The Delhi High Court directed the Delhi police not to harass people from the north-east and Ladakh. How much easier it would have been for the Delhi Police, if only citizenship and physiognomy matched perfectly.

But should one expect otherwise from these state and public institutions, given the fact that racism is rampant at the level of societal everyday experiences? For north-easterners who look in a particular manner, everyday living in Indian cities can be a gruelling experience. Be it the mundane overcharging of fares by autoricksaw-wallahs, shopkeepers and landlords, the verbal abuse on the streets and the snide remarks of colleagues, friends, teachers, or the more extreme experiences of physical and sexual assaults. It is often a never-ending nightmare, a chronicle of repetitive experience.

One also wonders if racial attitudes, if not outright racism, influence many more aspects of life than one imagines. For instance, whether there is any racial profiling of employment opportunities, given the concentration of jobs for north-easterners mostly in the hospitality sector, young women in beauty salons, restaurants and as shop assistants.

Visible and unseen


Of course, racism is difficult to prove — whether in the death of Richard or in the case of harassment of a woman from the north-east. And it should not surprise us if racism cannot be clearly established in either of these cases because that's how racism works — both the visible, explicit manifestations as well as the insidious, unseen machinations. Quite often, one can't even recount exactly what was wrong about the way in which a co-passenger behaved, difficult to articulate a sneer, a tone of voice that threatened or taunted, the cultural connotations that can infuriate.

How does one prove that when an autorickshaw driver asks a north-easterner on the streets of Delhi if he or she is going to Majnu ka Tila, a Tibetan refugee colony, that the former is reproducing a common practice of racial profiling? This remark could be doubly interpreted if made to a woman from the region — both racial and gendered. How do I prove racism when a young co-passenger on the Delhi Metro plays “Chinese” sounding music on his mobile, telling his friend that he is providing, “background music,” sneering and laughing in my direction? And what one cannot retell in the language of evidence, becomes difficult to prove. Racism is most often felt, perceived, like an invisible wound, difficult to articulate or recall in the language of the law or evidence. In that sense, everyday forms of racism are more experiential rather than an objectively identifiable situation.

Of course, every once in a while, there will be an incident of extreme, outrageous violence that is transparently racial in nature and we will rally around and voice our anger but it is these insidious, everyday forms of racial discrimination that bruise the body and the mind, build up anger and frustration. Fighting these everyday humiliations exhausts our attempts at expression.

If one is serious about fighting racial discrimination, this is where rules must change — by proving to us that in Richard's death there was no element of racism. Given the pervasiveness of racism in everyday life, why should we listen when we are told that those who fought with him over a TV remote were immune to it?

To recognise that racism exists in this country and that many unintended actions might emanate from racism can be a good place to start fighting the problem. To be oblivious of these issues or to deny its existence is to be complicit in the discriminatory regime. Also, the reason for fighting against racism is not because it is practised against “our” own citizens but because it is wrong regardless of whether the victims of racism are citizens of the country or not. One way to be critical of racism is to recognise and make visible the presence of racism rather than merely resorting to legalistic means to curb this discrimination.

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