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THE 54 YEAR INDO-NAGA CONFLICT: A QUESTION OF INTERNAL INDIAN ETHNIC CONFLICT OR A CONFLICT BETWEEN TWO NATIONS

From a paper presented by Kaka D. Iralu on the Indo-Naga conflict at the Indian Council of Social Sciences Research (ICSSR) sponsored National Seminar on Resolving Ethnic Conflicts in North East India. (Guwahati, Assam, November 11-12, 2002)

Source: Nagaland - The Unknown World, KAKA WEB

INTRODUCTION

1. In the light of modern political developments, the author will first try to develop a conceptual understanding of the word ethnic identity and national identity in relation to Nagaland and India. The first section will also point out the striking differences between the ethnic and national identities of Nagaland and India in the light of history, race, culture, religion and other factors.

2. In the next section, the author will give a brief history of the development of how different and even diverse ethnic identities merged into modern nation state in the modern world. These modern phenomena began in the 13th century and culminated in the 20th century. The author will trace the his…

THE WRONG NOTE

Soibam Haripriya wrote this article for the Imphal Free Press on 8 March 2013

The year had started on a wrong note. The month of January saw a newspaper based in Imphal, Manipur reporting on a disastrous marriage between a meitei woman and a non-meitei man which ended with the man deserting the woman. Apart from the extremely insensitive coverage, the title “Mayang Nupigi Phijetta Ngaoduna Lamchat kangba Mayangda mayum palluba meitei nupi awaba tare” literally translated as– “Fascinated with the dress of mayang women a meitei woman marries an immoral mayang man and has to face trouble” With as mild a translation as possible, what the title evokes along with the content is anyone’s guess. Reams and reams of any written narrative and stereotypical view of what people broadly call northeast India, speaks about the freedom that the women from these societies are used to. That cannot be farther from the truth. Most khunai kanba movements (the movements to save the community, preserve an ea…