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ARMED CONFLICT SITUATIONS AND APPLICABLE INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW VIS-À-VIS THE FIGHT AGAINST RACIST REGIMES IN THE EXERCISE OF THE RIGHT OF SELF-DETERMINATION – A CASE STUDY OF MANIPUR

This thesis was written by Yumnam Premananda Singh, Assistant Professor, Mizoram Law College, Aizawl, and originally posted on E-pao.net
ABSTRACT

Violence and genocide often arise from racial and ethnic discrimination. Discrimination can easily lead to racially and ethnically motivated violence, which in turn, may escalate into genocide.

Manipur had been an independent nation before 1949. Manipur has been under the shadow of racist and repressive legislation the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, 1958 for last 50 years and armed conflict between State and non-state actors and between non-state actors are also increasingly violent because of the racist regime and persistent demand for self determination. International standard concerning applicable International Humanitarian Law (IHL) are fragrantly violated by both parties and blanket impunity has been granted to the State actors in violation of established norms of International Human Rights and Humanitarian Laws. Many lives including…

CONFLICT IN MANIPUR: ISSUES, CAUSES AND CONCERNS

By Abhishek Mohanty
Originally published by the E-pao on 1 Nov 2013

Forty-one years ago, on January 21, 1972, Manipur became a full-fledged State of the Indian Union. The status was granted belatedly and hesitantly, a most underwhelming gift. In the popular perception, this was not a big deal. Manipur in its historical imagination was an "independent kingdom" since 1st century AD. Its people had 'histories' and 'memories,' longer and deeper than those of most other Indian people when India attained independence. The use of the plurals is necessary, for this historical imagination is not commonly and equally cherished by all the peoples of Manipur. While the Meiteis, the majority inhabiting the Imphal Valley, shares these histories and memories, the peoples in the outlying Hills cherish other memories, other histories.