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Showing posts from July, 2012

MANIPUR NOT EMPOWERED TO ENACT ILP: MHA

This news article was originally published by the Nagaland Post on 17 July 2012

Although the joint committee on Inner Line Permit (ILP) has been insisting that the state government alone can introduce ILP in Manipur, a senior official in Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) clarified, “Manipur government is not empowered to either enact or introduce the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulations, 1873. It has to refer the matter to the Centre.”

THE ALIEN BOGEY AND IBOBI’S PREDICAMENT

By Yambem Laba
This article was originally published by The Statesman and later by the Imphal Free Press on 18 July 2012


When the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulation was enacted by the British in 1873 for “peace and Government of certain Districts on the Eastern Frontier of Bengal” and to pave the way for the introduction of the “Inner Lines” in what is today the North-eastern region of India, Manipur did not figure as it was an independent entity and a trusted British ally. The first notification under Section 2 of the said regulation was issued on 8 March 1876, whereby the Governor General in Council was pleased to “prohibit all British subjects from going beyond the ‘Inner Line’ hereby notified without a pass under the hand and seal of the Deputy Commissioner of the concerned district”.

WEB OF WRITING: INTERNET AND THE NORTHEAST

by Gitanjali Das  This article was originally published by the Seven Sisters Post on 16 July 2012 at http://sevensisterspost.com/?p=24593#
The Internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow,” said Bill Gates, and rightly so. The Net has over the last few years come to be accepted as an indispensable part of our lives; the information superhighway has opened up a wide array of possibilities to educate and empower netizens. With the rise of social media, more and more people, regardless of geographical boundary, are sharing information on almost everything under the sun. With bloggers and online groups growing in numbers, the Web today is a valuable tool for performing and showcasing creative activity. In Northeast India too, people are joining hands, though not on a large scale, to promote and preserve the literature of the region through the medium of the Internet.

MESSINESS AS SOCIAL AGENDA: DILEMMA OF TRANSITION

By Amar Yumnam
This article was originally published by the Imphal Free Press on 9 July 2012 

Every individual and every society goes through phases of transformation. This is however never a continuous process nor a linear progression. It could happen that a single phase may continue for long like hormonal problems in individuals. Instead of progression there could be phases of regression like period of violence in African or Middle East countries. But the fact remains that, whatever the phase, the most critical period is the one of transition from the existing phase to a new one. The issue becomes much more critical in the case of a society. An atmosphere of progression would generally generate forces of further positive advancement and the tensions involved would mostly result in positive fall-outs. But if the prevailing context is one of regression or violence or conflict, the transition period becomes doubly critical. The transition could be towards further regression and the col…

PATHOS OF SELF ESTRANGEMENT

By Angomcha Bimol Akoijam This article was originally published by the Imphal Free Press on 27 June 2012

It seems, times have truly changed for the mandarins in New Delhi. Delivering a lecture at a well-known institute in Delhi, former Union Home Secretary G.K. Pillai remarks that Manipur is suffering from a ‘collective depression’. And a ‘way forward’ for Manipur would require one to acknowledge this ‘depression’ and address what he terms as the “core issues” rooted in the history of the state. He went on to describe the issues such as the manner in which the Merger of Manipur was effected and the delay in granting “statehood” or recognition to Manipuri language under the Constitution as aspects of those issues. He even went on to suggest that the way forward must begin with an admission that ‘we have made mistakes” in the past and an ‘apology’ led by the Prime Minister to the people of the state.

THE SEARCH AND MAKING OF A CHIEF MINISTER

By Usham Dhananjoy Singh
This article was originally published by the Sangai Express on 28 Nov 2008

The election to the Manipur State Assembly began on 11th June 1948 and continued upto 27th July 1948. Out of the 53 seats, 30 seats were for the valley, 18 seats for the hills, 3 seats for the Muslims and 2 seats for the professional groups. In the election that followed, Krishak Sabha won 6 seats, Congress 14 seats, Prajashanti 12 seats and 18 seats were won by the Hill men. Praja Shanti formed a coalition Govt with the support of the Krishak Sabha and the Hillmen. In the given situation Maharaja Bodhachandra Singh did not even confide his own brother, MK Priyobarta Singh who was a potential claimant to the post of Chief Minister. The other claimants to the post were Sanasam Gourahari Singh, Maharaja's Private Secretary and Rajkumar Setu Singh.

A RECOLLECTION OF THE FIRST DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENT IN MANIPUR

by Prof. Ksh. Bimola Devi
This article was originally published by Manipur Mail on 19 Oct 2010
The Manipur State Constitution Act, 1947 marked a very important chapter in the political history of Manipur. It was the fulfillment of a long cherished dream of the people to be under a democratic system having a government run by their own representatives. In a sense it took about 20 years to achieve the desired goal of having a democratic government in Manipur.

CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN RESPECT OF MANIPUR

by Dr. A. K. Chishti This article was originally published by Huieyen Lanpao and Sangai Express and later by E-pao.net in June 2010.

While acknowledging the Second Administrative Reforms Commission for reposing confidence in the Association of Premier State College Seniors of Manipur (APSCS) and giving the privilege of making an effective representation of the people's interest about the State of affairs and the "Conflict Resolution" thereon by extending the time when the commission heard us at Imphal on the 28th July 2007, we wish to begin with a few words about our own Association, perhaps the first of its kind in the country.